Tom Brady: How the Greatest Eats to Stay Great

Tom Brady Diet

Even though Tom Brady’s teen years are far behind him, VarCity is always looking to get health and fitness ideas from people out there doing it best.  And with 5 Super Bowl wins, 4 Super Bowl MVP awards, 12 Pro Bowl appearances and more division titles than any quarterback in NFL history (14), Tom Brady definitely qualifies.  Tom Brady's personal chef Allen Campbell recently sat down with Boston.com and let us know the quarterback's top food preferences.  Below are the interview highlights and please note that VarCity hasn’t verified any of the dietary claims made by Tom Brady’s personal chef.  Also, if you want to read the entire unedited interview click here.

1. You mentioned that your philosophy was a great match with what they were looking for in a chef. How would you describe your philosophy as a chef?

Campbell:  My philosophy is that a plant-based diet has the power to reverse and prevent disease.

2. How does that philosophy translate in terms of what you cook for Tom, Gisele, and the kids?

Campbell: So, 80 percent of what they eat is vegetables. [I buy] the freshest vegetables. If it’s not organic, I don’t use it. And whole grains: brown rice, quinoa, millet, beans. The other 20 percent is lean meats: grass-fed organic steak, duck every now and then, and chicken. As for fish, I mostly cook wild salmon.

3. What ingredients don’t you use?

Campbell: No white sugar.  No white flour. No MSG.  I only cook with coconut oil.  Fats like canola oil turn into trans fats...I use Himalayan pink salt as the sodium.  I never use iodized salt.

4.  What else?

No coffee.  No caffeine.  No fungus.  No dairy.  The kids eat fruit.  Tom, not so much. He will eat bananas in a smoothie. But otherwise, he prefers not to eat fruits.

5. What are some recent meals you’ve cooked for the family?

Campbell: I’m all about serving meals in bowls.  I’ve just did this quinoa dish with wilted greens. I use kale or Swiss chard or beet greens.  I add garlic, toasted in coconut oil.  And then some toasted almonds, or this cashew sauce with lime curry, lemongrass, and a little bit of ginger.  That’s just comfort food for them.

6. How different are Tom’s meals before games compared to what he normally eats?

Campbell: It’s really not different.  The only real difference [in terms of the kinds of things I cook] is seasonal.  In the wintertime, it’s going to be more red meat and more soups and root vegetables.  And in the summer, they eat lighter, so I’ll make raw lasagna and more salads.